Tag Archives: fpga

NetFPGA

One of the challenges faced in networking research and education is the difficulty of accurately recreating a network environment. Production routers are implemented as hardware devices, but designing and fabricating a new hardware design for research or teaching is very expensive. Modular software routers like Click enable research and education on routing in software, but don’t allow experimentation with hardware and physical-layer issues.

NetFPGA aims to rectify this, by providing an easy-programmable hardware platform for network devices (NICs, switches, routers, etc.). Users interact with NetFPGA remotely, uploading programs that configure FPGAs on the device appropriately, and then observing the results. The initial version of NetFPGA didn’t have a CPU: instead, software to control the device runs on another computer, and accesses hardware registers remotely (using special Ethernet packets that are decoded by the NetFPGA board). The second version of NetFPGA has an optional hardware CPU.

Discussion

This seems like a pretty incontrovertible “good idea.” One potential question is how the performance of an FPGA-based router compares to that of realistic production hardware — I’d suspect that NetFPGA-routers occupy a middle ground between software-only routers (easy to develop, poor performance) and production routers (difficult to program and expensive to fabricate, but good performance).

Leave a comment

Filed under Paper Summaries